a person sketching

Design Process For The Win

I know for a fact that whenever you are assigned a project that requires 10 sketches, you make them after. That doesn’t help you. In fact, you are putting yourself at a disadvantage, the other routes you could have explored likely would have resulted in a more refined final product. I am sharing with you my go to design process that will work for more than just assignments, but first of all, a story to emphasize the importance of having a design process. Enjoy!

There was an occasion in which I did not follow the design process, it was a mess. Once I heard the description of the assignment I had a semi-clear picture of what I wanted to do from the start. I didn’t sketch the idea or anything. Fast forward a couple days to where I’m about to start working, I try to make something, anything,  but nothing is working. The layout is wrong, some of the elements look off. It was a disaster, and I realized that so I tried to switch ideas a.k.a. disaster part 2. I eventually went back to my original idea, sketched some things out and got feedback. I never was pleased with the end result but long story short, follow your version of the design process described below.

My Process

Once I’ve heard the outline of the assignment I make a list of what I already know and start drawing, quick sketches to make sure none of my ideas get lost. You don’t need to draw the whole thing, elements that you plan to include are a great place to start. If you’re having trouble finding somewhere to get started check out my other blog post: How To Find Inspiration.

The more feedback the better. Photo Credit: StockSnap on Pixabay

Get some feedback on your sketches. When conducting surveys, the more replies you get the more accurate your results will be, something I’ve also found to be true with feedback.  I usually show one of my friends or a family members my sketches because I like to get a range of perspectives.

Take note of the feedback you were given and apply it in the next set of sketches you make. It’s good to get feedback but you have to use it effectively for it to be worth your time.

I combine all my sketches and feedback to make a final sketch so there’s no guesswork on my computer. It’s only once I’ve completed that final sketch that I will even open my computer. While I’m working, I keep my original inspiration close by and a mood-board if I have one.

Stay inspired. Photo Credits: Cottonbro from Pexels

You can use the design process for more than just school projects, it’s applicable to almost any situation that comes your way. It’s a form of problem solving.

I’ve included a link to interaction-design.org that includes a step by step design process and a worksheet you can follow.

I hope you found this helpful, thanks for reading!

From the Beginner designer to Intermediate one – Part 2(Tips for Sharing)

Last week, I introduced the first tool : The colours. Miranda asked some questions about how to share with other Adobe registration or non-registration users, here I would like to answer her concern.
First, only the Adobe registered users could share and use the colour swatch.
Secondly, the created colour swatch could export as ASE(Adobe Swatch Exchange file) and images; it could create a link to share with others.
Thirdly, the colour swatch can share the message, mail, facebook, iCloud, Google Drive and work software or app for both PC and MAC or non-Adobe registered users.
As an interactive media designer who needs to draw on software and using the colours tool, buying an Adobe suite is necessary.

Back to today’s topic, I would like to introduce one more  tool in Adobe Capture CC which is brushes.

The purpose of the brushes tool is to let users record the patterns, images or a little doodles as brushes and used in Photoshop, Illustrator, and Sketch.

The way to create brushes is similar to the colours tool, click on “+” again, and it will turn on the camera. There is a white dot shown in camera screen, drag it to your pattern area and take the picture. Crop the brush pattern capture area and then choose the styles you like in different Adobe software. Please notice that the brush styles are black and white in Photoshop and Illustrator, but it is colour brushes in Sketch brushes style. Under the presets menu, users can adjust the brushes attributes differently, and it’s different attributes settings between different software.

Finally, users can edit, duplicate, share brushes and upload to users library or template.

This brushes tool is quite handy when you try to draw complex symbols as a background pattern, and then merely repeating brushes will make your job easy and unique.

For the next post, I will elaborate the ultimate handy tool: patterns.