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My Design Process

Most designers have some sort of moral code that they use so they know where and when to start their work and how to create it productively. This is considered the ‘Design Process’ and it’s never really the same for everyone. So I’m going to tell you a little bit about mine, and how I am able to produce results in a relatively low time.

The Starting Phase

At the beginning of any sort of project that I’ve begin working on, I always try to ask as many questions as I possibly can. Not only does this provide me more information than what was originally given, but it helps support my ideas that I might have because I know the things I can and cannot do.

Additionally, while I’m first starting to work on my project, I tend to also create expectations and deadlines for myself so I know I won’t fall behind at all. If for whatever reason I do happen to, I have a back-up plan in place to help cushion that fall.

The Brainstorming Phase

Once when everything is set in stone, I begin the brainstorming phase. At this time, I usually have my sketch book and pencil with me so I can doodle and get the ideas I have out onto a piece of paper so I don’t loose track of them. To gather these ideas, I usually try finding inspiration on the subject and go from there.

In this field, a lot of work can either be completed independently or through group work. With that in mind, my methods may shift a little bit depending on how/ who I am working along side.

The Creation Phase

The creating phase is where most designers go crazy. This is where all your ideas become fully formed and all you need to do is create them. This could minutes, hours or even days, but it doesn’t matter because we enjoy the time to create things and like doing the best that we can. At least for me, that’s how it feels.

Revisions

Lastly, when everything is set in stone, most designers like to end quickly so they can move on to the next project. That’s not me. I push through that urge and look for the fine details that I may have missed because that’s what the client, instructor, etc… will be looking for.

To end, this is my design process. Most of the components of it can be used universally by other designers, but everybody does their work differently and that’s what allows us to have a wide range of creative freedom, and that’s what this world needs.

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The Top Five Things A Graphic Designer Needs!

Whether you are at the start of your career, or you are designing for fun, it can be hard to find a starting point to get into the proper work flow to excel and impress the people that you are doing it for. Below are the ‘Top 5 Things’ you should consider using if you are interested in becoming a Graphic Designer.

1. Sketchbook and Pencil

Image of a sketch book.
Credit to: Google Images

If you are considering doing any sort of design work, you should have a sketchbook with you. If you’re anything like me, and can’t draw for the life of you, don’t panic. A sketch book lets jot down those ideas that would take too long for you to do on a computer. This is important because if you are working with clients or are limited on time, you shouldn’t waste time waiting too long to come up with a concept that will work.

2. A Computer and Mouse

Having a device that is strong enough to handle your working tasks is always nice to have. Whether you are creating catalogues for your client or drawing new designs for a clothing brand, having a computer to be able to create these media files will be well worth it. The mouse controls your movement through the designs so that you can do them precisely.

3. System Software

Image of Adobe Creative Cloud Logo's
Image Courtesy to: Adobe Creative Cloud

As simple as it may seem, having software that enables you to create your designs. In terms of software that is out there, I personally suggest using Adobe Creative Cloud. The reasoning for this, is due to its simplicity but the functionality of what it provides for the user is incomparable to other software that are available. Some programs that may sound familiar are Photoshop, Illustrator and Premiere Pro.

4. A Thinking Space

With life as it is, being creative can have its hardships if it isn’t always practiced or is interrupted by others. So at number 4, having a thinking space allows for you to have time and pull 100% of your thoughts to achieving what you are wanting. The space doesn’t have to be large either, whether it’s your bedroom, in your living room, or if you do your best thinking in the shower, it’s all up to you, and that’s the best part of it. Once you do happen to find this space, make sure to use it. Actively practicing creative skills will help you in the long run!

5. Headphones

Having headphones allows you to focus on your work, and can have your own headspace in a busy environment. This is fantastic for designers because a lot of our work happens in our head and having that clear space to think about it allows for better efficiency when you work, which could eventually allow you to get more jobs.